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SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS: July 2005
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HD 188753
'Star Wars world' found in triple star system
(July 15, 2005)


A giant planet has been discovered in a tight-knit system of three stars – reminiscent of the binary-star system of Tatooine, Luke Skywalker's home planet in the movie "Star Wars". Its survival, against all odds, presents a major challenge to theories of how planets form. The new Jupiter-class planet orbits close to a Sun-like star, while two further stars circle farther out, at roughly the distance between Saturn and the Sun. How that planet formed in such a complicated setting is very puzzling, says Maciej Konacki of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

teleportation experiment
Scientists try to harness teleportation
(July 15, 2005)


Think "Star Trek": You are here. You want to go there. Its just a matter of teleportation. Thanks to lab experiments, there is growth in the number of "beam me up" believers, but there is an equal amount of disbelief, too. Over the last few years, however, researchers have successfully teleported beams of light across a laboratory bench. Also, the quantum state of a trapped calcium ion to another calcium ion has been teleported in a controlled way.

Read more. Source: MSNBC

Soyuz launch vehicle
Russia approves new space plans
(July 15, 2005)


The Russian government has approved a space programme for the next ten years. The programme provides money for the development of a reusable spacecraft to replace the ageing Soyuz manned launch vehicle. Russia also wants to start experiments to test whether it is possible for humans to make the flight to Mars.

Read more. Source: BBC

Shenzou V
Date set for China space shot
(July 15, 2005)


China's second manned space mission – called Shenzhou VI – will launch in early October, a state newspaper has reported. This time, authorities will send two astronauts into space and they will orbit the Earth for five or six days. "The manned spacecraft Shenzhou VI will ... preferably be launched in early October," Sun Weigang, director of the Space Department of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp, told the China Daily.

Read more. Source: BBC

HD 188753
'Star Wars world' found in triple star system
(July 15, 2005)


A giant planet has been discovered in a tight-knit system of three stars – reminiscent of the binary-star system of Tatooine, Luke Skywalker's home planet in the movie "Star Wars". Its survival, against all odds, presents a major challenge to theories of how planets form. The new Jupiter-class planet orbits close to a Sun-like star, while two further stars circle farther out, at roughly the distance between Saturn and the Sun. "How that planet formed in such a complicated setting is very puzzling," says Maciej Konacki of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

teleportation experiment
Scientists try to harness teleportation
(July 15, 2005)


Think "Star Trek": You are here. You want to go there. Its just a matter of teleportation. Thanks to lab experiments, there is growth in the number of "beam me up" believers, but there is an equal amount of disbelief, too. Over the last few years, however, researchers have successfully teleported beams of light across a laboratory bench. Also, the quantum state of a trapped calcium ion to another calcium ion has been teleported in a controlled way.

Read more. Source: MSNBC

Soyuz launch vehicle
Russia approves new space plans
(July 15, 2005)


The Russian government has approved a space programme for the next ten years. The programme provides money for the development of a reusable spacecraft to replace the ageing Soyuz manned launch vehicle. Russia also wants to start experiments to test whether it is possible for humans to make the flight to Mars.

Read more. Source: BBC

Space Shuttle
Shuttle launch still on schedule
(July 13, 2005)


A damaged panel on space shuttle Discovery caused by a falling window cover will not affect Wednesday's launch, NASA officials have said. The falling cover damaged two heat-shield tiles on the panel near the rear of the shuttle. But engineers say they have already replaced the panel, which is said to be a routine procedure. This week's mission would be the first since the loss of Columbia and its seven astronauts in February 2003.

Read more. Source: BBC

new species of Erenna
Deep-sea animal hunts with light
(July 11, 2005)


A new species of deep-sea animal has been discovered, which uses glowing red tentacles to lure small fish to their deaths, Science magazine reports. The species, which has not yet been named, belongs to the genus Erenna , which is a member of the group that contains corals and jellyfish. Initially, scientists were surprised the creature used red light, which is known to carry only short distances. But they think it might be imitating a certain shrimp, which also glows red.

Read more. Source: BBC

Shuttle STS114 crew
Discovery crew reports for duty
(July 10, 2005)


Sporting fresh haircuts and confident smiles, the seven astronauts who will fly on the Discovery shuttle arrived at NASA's Florida spaceport on Saturday. "It's been 2 1/2 years since a crew has stood here before you," astronaut Andy Thomas told a group of journalists. "That's way too long and it is definitely time that we went back to flight and back to space." The countdown clocks start on Sunday for the first space shuttle mission since the loss of the Columbia orbiter.

Read more. Source: BBC

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