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SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS: April 2008
Home > Space & Science News > Space & Science News: April 2008: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4


Monster black hole found escaping home galaxy Apr 30, 2008
Cosmic time warp revealed in slow-motion supernovae Apr 29, 2008
Wild galaxies collide Apr 28, 2008
Plan to identify watery earth-like planets develops Apr 27, 2008
Space 'spiderwebs' could propel future probes Apr 25, 2008
Solar system could go haywire before the Sun dies Apr 24, 2008
Black hole plasma jet reveals twisted magnetic fields Apr 23, 2008
Mysterious 'bright young things' found in solar system Apr 23, 2008
The drifting star Apr 22, 2008
Moon's birth changed the length of days on Earth Apr 20, 2008
ET contact odds 'extremely low' Apr 19, 2008
'Babelfish' to translate alien tongues could be built Apr 19, 2008
Stars born in galactic wilderness Apr 18, 2008
Plants 'thrive' on Moon rock diet Apr 17, 2008
Pioneer spacecraft mystery may be laid to rest Apr 16, 2008
Milky Way's giant black hole awoke from slumber 300 years ago Apr 15, 2008
Visions of Sun's great 'belches' Apr 15, 2008
Rocket Racing League announces first exhibition race Apr 14, 2008
Crippled probe may send cargo drifting into space Apr 14, 2008
Why is the universe's brightest blast still blazing? Apr 12, 2008
NASA spacecraft fine tunes course for Mars landing Apr 11, 2008
Smallest exoplanet may have been found Apr 11, 2008
Did pre-big bang universe leave its mark on the sky? Apr 10, 2008
Galaxies' spiral arms may betray black holes' weight Apr 9, 2008
Genesis machine poised to end quest for 'God particle' Apr 8, 2008
Solar System's 'look-alike' found Apr 7, 2008
Divisive idea 'explains galaxies' Apr 6, 2008
Black hole found in Omega Centauri Apr 5, 2008
Robot space truck docks with ISS Apr 4, 2008
'No Sun link' to climate change Apr 3, 2008
Astronomers see 'youngest planet' Apr 2, 2008
Universe's tiniest black hole discovered Apr 2, 2008
Two new star systems are first of their kind Apr 2, 2008
Dainty space truck proves itself Apr 1, 2008


A black hole escaping from its host galaxy. Credit: (MPE/Galaxy image) HST/NASA
Monster black hole found escaping home galaxy
(Apr 30, 2008)


A mammoth black hole has been discovered fleeing its host galaxy at high speed, according to a controversial new study. The galactic eviction may be the result of a violent merger between two black holes. The object in question is a quasar called SDSS J0927+2943.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

a supernova in a nearby galaxy
Cosmic time warp revealed in slow-motion supernovae
(Apr 29, 2008)


Once upon a time, time was different. Supernova explosions in the early universe appear to age more slowly than today's supernovae, as if time itself was running slower back then, according to a recent series of astronomical observations. This cosmic time warp is exactly what should be produced by the expansion of the universe, confirming conventional big bang theory.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Arp 148
Wild galaxies collide
(Apr 28, 2008)


NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 18th anniversary with a new collection of images showcasing colliding galaxies, including some captured by JPL's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. This picture from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 shows Arp 148, the staggering aftermath of an encounter between two galaxies that resulted in a ring-shaped galaxy and a long-tailed companion.

Read more. Source: NASA/JPL

Earthlike planet
Plan to identify watery earth-like planets develops
(Apr 27, 2008)


Astronomers are looking to identify Earth-like watery worlds circling distant stars from a glint of light seen through an optical space telescope and a mathematical method developed by researchers at Penn State and the University of Hawaii. "We are looking for Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of their star, a band not too hot nor too cold for life to exist," says Darren M. Williams, associate professor of physics and astronomy, Penn State Erie, the Behrend College. "We also want to know if there is water on these planets."

Read more. Source: Penn State University

spiderweb solar web
Space 'spiderwebs' could propel future probes
(Apr 25, 2008)


A new type of solar sail has been woven by a team of scientists in Finland. The spiderweb-like sail is designed to catch the wind of ionized gas that blows from the Sun, carrying spacecraft to the outer reaches of the solar system, or letting them tack back and forth through the asteroid belt on exploration or mining missions.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Earth-Mars collision
Solar system could go haywire before the Sun dies
(Apr 24, 2008)


How will life on Earth end? The answer, of course, is unknown, but two new studies suggest a collision with Mercury or Mars could doom life long before the Sun swells into a red giant and bakes the planet to a crisp in about 5 billion years.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

black holes and corkscrew jets
Black hole plasma jet reveals twisted magnetic fields
(Apr 23, 2008)


Black holes don't just consume everything nearby – occasionally they fire out huge corkscrews of gas. Now the first look down the barrel of one of these jets has uncovered its origins.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

2003 EL61 (K40506A)
Mysterious 'bright young things' found in solar system
(Apr 23, 2008)


Some families seem blessed with eternal youth, looking much younger than their years. Now, astronomers have found just such a clan of icy objects in the outer solar system. They appear puzzlingly fresh-faced, despite the fact that they probably formed in a collision more than a billion years ago.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Iota Horologii
The drifting star
(Apr 22, 2008)


By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harboring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the constellation Horologium, belongs to the so-called Hyades stream, a large number of stars that move in the same direction.

Read more. Source: European Southern Observatory

formation of Moon by impact, artist's conception
Moon's birth changed the length of days on Earth
(Apr 20, 2008)


The collision that formed our moon may have defined the length of our planet's day and set the direction in which it spins. The moon is widely thought to have formed after an object roughly the size of Mars crashed into the Earth 4.5 billion years ago, throwing up a cloud of debris that eventually coalesced into a rocky sphere.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

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