Earth from space banner



SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS: June 2009
home > space & science news > space & science news: June 2009: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4


In search of NASA's next rocket Jun 30, 2009
Joint Mars plan on talks agenda Jun 30, 2009
Sun leaves Earth wide open to cosmic rays Jun 29, 2009
Milky Way's super-efficient particle accelerators caught in the act Jun 28, 2009
Solar X-rays may create DNA building blocks on Titan Jun 27, 2009
Space shuttle exhaust hints comet caused Tunguska blast Jun 26, 2009
Gluttonous black holes power ancient cosmic 'blobs' Jun 25, 2009
'Misty caverns' on Enceladus moon Jun 25, 2009
Huge stellar nursery found in dusty corner of our galaxy Jun 24, 2009
NASA scientists bring light to Moon's permanently dark craters Jun 23, 2009
Europe to study freighter upgrade Jun 22, 2009
Work starts on New Mexico spaceport Jun 21, 2009
Herschel gives glimpse of power Jun 20, 2009
Doubts grow about NASA moon return Jun 19, 2009
Lift off for NASA's lunar probes Jun 18, 2009
Solar system's most volcanic body to go dormant Jun 18, 2009
High-speed 'wedge' for re-entry Jun 17, 2009
Physicists create 'black hole for sound' Jun 17, 2009
Magic carpets hide objects in plain sight Jun 16, 2009
'Resurrection bug' revived after 120,000 years Jun 15, 2009
Herschel telescope 'opens eyes' Jun 15, 2009
NASA cancels space shuttle launch Jun 13, 2009
Baby stars finally found in jumbled Galactic Center Jun 12, 2009
Japanese probe crashes into Moon Jun 12, 2009
Solar system's planets could spin out of control Jun 11, 2009
First extragalactic exoplanet may have been found Jun 11, 2009
Periodic table gets a new element Jun 11, 2009
Giant black holes just got bigger Jun 10, 2009
Betelgeuse: The incredible shrinking star? Jun 10, 2009
Astronomers solve mystery of 'dark' cosmic bursts Jun 9, 2009
Mars missions get in line Jun 8, 2009
Cassini finds Titan's clouds hang on to summer Jun 7, 2009
Free-floating black hole may solve space 'firefly' mystery Jun 6, 2009
Rusty space rocks could signal Mars water Jun 5, 2009
Armstrong's 'poetic' slip on Moon Jun 4, 2009
Space rocks turned tide for Earth Jun 3, 2009
Space headache a real phenomenon Jun 2, 2009
Dark-energy particle spotted? Jun 1, 2009


Ares I
In search of NASA's next rocket
(Jun 30, 2009)


The Ares I rocket, linchpin of NASA's plan to replace the Space Shuttle fleet with a new generation of manned space vehicles, has been beset by technical problems. In this New Scientist gallery, five alternative launch systems are highlighted – rockets that are now being seriously considered as alternatives to the beleaguered Ares.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

ExoMars rover test
Joint Mars plan on talks agenda
(Jun 30, 2009)


The US and European space agencies are to discuss the potential for mounting joint missions to Mars during a summit underway in Plymouth, UK. NASA's science chief Ed Weiler told BBC News that co-operation made sense given the agencies' shared science goals and the growing expense of such ventures. America is now likely to play a major role in Europe's 2016 ExoMars mission.

Read more. Source: BBC

Sun and Earth
Sun leaves Earth wide open to cosmic rays
(Jun 29, 2009)


The sun provides ideal conditions for life to thrive, right? In fact, it periodically leaves Earth open to assaults from interstellar nasties in a way that most stars do not.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

RCW 86
Milky Way's super-efficient particle accelerators caught in the act
(Jun 28, 2009)


Thanks to a unique "ballistic study" that combines data on the supernova remnant RCW 86 from ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have now solved a long-standing mystery of the Milky Way’s particle accelerators. They show in a paper published on June 25 Science Express that cosmic rays from our galaxy are very efficiently accelerated in the remnants of exploded stars.

Read more. Source: European Southern Observatory

Titan
Solar X-rays may create DNA building blocks on Titan
(Jun 27, 2009)


Blasting the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan with X-rays can produce a base component of DNA, a new laboratory study suggests. While the effect may only occur periodically, when meteoroid impacts deliver water to the moon's surface, the finding adds to evidence that Titan may be ripe for life.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

fallen trees following the Tunguska event of 1908
Space shuttle exhaust hints comet caused Tunguska blast
(Jun 26, 2009)


Was the Tunguska explosion of 1908 caused by a comet hitting Earth? That's the claim of a new study based on the behaviour of water vapour from the space shuttle's exhaust. But other scientists dispute the claim, and say the evidence still points to a stony meteoroid as the culprit.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Lyman-alpha blob
Gluttonous black holes power ancient cosmic 'blobs'
(Jun 25, 2009)


Mysterious blobs of gas dotting the early universe – Lyman-alpha blobs – seem to be lit by ravenous black holes at the hearts of massive galaxies, a new study suggests. Further study of the strange clouds could reveal how young galaxies regulate their meals to become the galaxies we see today.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Enceladus
'Misty caverns' on Enceladus moon
(Jun 25, 2009)


NASA's Cassini spacecraft has obtained strong evidence that Saturn's tiny moon Enceladus retains liquid water. The probe has detected sodium salts in the vicinity of the satellite, which appear to spew from its south pole. Liquid water that is in prolonged contact with rock will leach out sodium – in exactly the same way as Earth's oceans have become salty over time.

Read more. Source: BBC

Radio map of the region of the Perseus Arm containing CTB 102
Huge stellar nursery found in dusty corner of our galaxy
(Jun 24, 2009)


A vast stellar nursery 14,000 light years away has been hiding behind a thick cloud of dust. It is one of the biggest in our galaxy, and may offer insight into how these objects can grow so big. The stellar nursery, called CTB 102, is home to perhaps thousands of newborn stars.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

This color image is the highest resolution topography map to date of the moon's south pole
NASA scientists bring light to Moon's permanently dark craters
(Jun 23, 2009)


A new lunar topography map with the highest resolution of the Moon's rugged south polar region provides new information on some of our natural satellite's darkest inhabitants — permanently shadowed craters. The map was created by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., who collected the data using the Deep Space Network's Goldstone Solar System Radar located in California's Mojave Desert.

Read more. Source: NASA/JPL

1 | 2 | 3 | 4

BACK TO TOP



You are here:

Home
> Space & Science news
> June 2009:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4



Other news sections

Latest science news
Archeo news
Eco news
Health news
Living world news
Paleo news
Strange news
Tech news


Also on this site:

Encyclopedia of Science

Encyclopedia of Alternative Energy and Sustainable Living

News archive
Bookshop
Contact