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SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS: September 2010
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New Earth-like planet discovered Sep 30, 2010
'Space hotel' plan unveiled in Russia Sep 30, 2010
Hawking radiation glimpsed in artificial black hole Sep 29, 2010
Chance alignment makes Saturnian snowman Sep 28, 2010
Crashing galaxy clusters may turbocharge cosmic rays Sep 27, 2010
Shining starlight on the dark cocoons of star birth Sep 27, 2010
Einstein's theory is proved – and it is bad news if you own a penthouse Sep 26, 2010
Halos at the poles of the ringed planet Sep 25, 2010
Solved: mystery of the meteor-shedding asteroid Sep 24, 2010
Dimensions vanish in quantum gravity Sep 22, 2010
Large Hadron Collider spies hints of infant universe Sep 22, 2010
Massive blast 'created Mars moon' Sep 21, 2010
China could make moon landing in 2025 Sep 20, 2010
NASA tests robot hardware for planet missions Sep 20, 2010
Crater map rekindles debate over Moon impacts Sep 17, 2010
Boeing plans to fly tourists to space Sep 16, 2010
Cannibal star consumes neighbor Sep 16, 2010
M-theory: Doubts linger over godless multiverse Sep 15, 2010
Asteroid impact may have gassed Earth Sep 14, 2010
Building Hubble's heir in deep space Sep 14, 2010
Discovery shuttle is prepared for its final voyage Sep 13, 2010
Halley's comet 'was spotted by the ancient Greeks' Sep 13, 2010
Tiny tractor beams enter the third dimension Sep 11, 2010
Alien oceans could be detected by telescopes Sep 10, 2010
Found: natural bridges on the Moon Sep 10, 2010
Laws of physics may change across the universe Sep 9, 2010
Cosmic spiral created by whirling stars Sep 9, 2010
Exotic matter could show up in the LHC this year Sep 9, 2010
Dwarf galaxies gobbled by their giant neighbors Sep 8, 2010
Mars may not be lifeless, say scientists Sep 7, 2010
Hubble telescope re-shoots 1987 supernova Sep 6, 2010
Eternal black holes are the ultimate cosmic safes Sep 4, 2010
Space ribbon deployed to surf Earth's magnetic field Sep 3, 2010
Weird water lurking inside giant planets Sep 2, 2010
Old star wallows in 'steam bath' Sep 2, 2010
Mammoth-killing space blast 'off the hook' Sep 1, 2010


Artist's impression of 581g
New Earth-like planet discovered
(Sep 30, 2010)


Astronomers have discovered a potentially habitable planet of similar size to Earth in orbit around a nearby star. A team of planet hunters spotted the alien world circling a red dwarf star called Gliese 581, 20 light-years away. The planet is in the "Goldilocks zone" of space around a star where surface temperatures are neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water to form.

Read more. Source: The Guardian

Soyuz capsule docked with the International Space Station
'Space hotel' plan unveiled in Russia
(Sep 30, 2010)


A Russian company has unveiled an ambitious plan to launch a "cosmic hotel" for wealthy space tourists. Orbital Technologies says its "comfortable" four-room guest house could be in orbit by 2016, Russia's RIA Novosti news agency reports. Guests would be ferried to the hotel on a Soyuz shuttle of the type used to transport cosmonauts to the International Space Station.

Read more. Source: BBC

artificial event horizon
Hawking radiation glimpsed in artificial black hole
(Sep 29, 2010)


You might expect black holes to be, well, black, but several decades ago Stephen Hawking calculated that they should emit light. Now, for the first time, physicists led by Francesco Belgiorno of the University of Milan, Italy, claim that they have observed this weird glow in the lab.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Dione and Rhea
Chance alignment makes Saturnian snowman
(Sep 28, 2010)


This fledgling snowman is actually a chance alignment of two of Saturn's larger moons, Dione and Rhea. Dione, the moon at the top of the image, is actually three-quarters the size of Rhea. NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured this image when Dione fell between the spacecraft and Rhea.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Shock wave produced by collision of galaxy clusters
Crashing galaxy clusters may turbocharge cosmic rays
(Sep 27, 2010)


The biggest collisions in the cosmos seem to be acting as giant particle accelerators, generating some of the mysterious ultra-high energy cosmic rays that slam into Earth. Researchers led by Reinout van Weeren of Leiden University have used radio telescopes in the Netherlands, India, and the US to image a huge bright arc at the interface of two colliding galaxy clusters, known collectively as CIZA J2242.8+5301.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

coreshine
Shining starlight on the dark cocoons of star birth
(Sep 27, 2010)


Astronomers have discovered a new, cosmic phenomenon, termed "coreshine," which is revealing new information about how stars and planets come to be. The scientists used data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to measure infrared light deflecting off cores cold, dark cocoons where young stars and planetary systems are blossoming. This coreshine effect, which occurs when starlight from nearby stars bounces off the cores, reveals information about their age and consistency.

Read more. Source: NASA/JPL

Einstein
Einstein's theory is proved – and it is bad news if you own a penthouse
(Sep 26, 2010)


According Einstein's theory of relativity, the speed of light is constant which means that time can run faster or slower depending on how high you are, and how fast you are traveling. Now scientists have demonstrated the true nature of Einstein's theory with an incredibly accurate atomic clock that is able to keep time to within one second in about 3.7 billion years – roughly the same length of time that life has existed on Earth.

Read more. Source: The Independent

Saturn polar halo
Halos at the poles of the ringed planet
(Sep 25, 2010)


Saturn was already the solar system's undisputed lord of the rings. Now newly processed images from the Cassini spacecraft are revealing previously unseen halos of infrared auroral light above the planet's poles.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

Geminid meteor
Solved: mystery of the meteor-shedding asteroid
(Sep 24, 2010)


An asteroid that is the source of an annual meteor shower may owe its weird crumbliness to intense cooking by the sun. Most meteor showers are thought to come from comets, whose icy surfaces vaporize easily during close encounters with the sun. Dust that is liberated in the process burns up in Earth's atmosphere, creating "shooting stars".

Read more. Source: New Scientist

quantum dimensions
Dimensions vanish in quantum gravity
(Sep 22, 2010)


Forget Flatland, the two-dimensional world imagined in the 1884 novella by Edwin Abbott. On tiny scales, 3D space may give way to mere lines. So say researchers working on theories of quantum gravity, which aim to unite quantum mechanics with general relativity. They have recently noticed that several different quantum gravity theories all predict the same strange behavior at small scales: fields and particles start to behave as if space is one-dimensional.

Read more. Source: New Scientist

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