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SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS: May 2012
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Splashdown for SpaceX Dragon spacecraft May 31, 2012
Ghostly jets seen streaming from Milky Way's core May 30, 2012
NASA to hold news conference about NuSTAR launch May 28, 2012
Africa and Australasia to share Square Kilometre Array May 27, 2012
SpaceX Dragon set for rendezvous with station May 25, 2012
Bottled carbon from Mars bodes well for ancient aliens May 24, 2012
Neil Armstrong breaks his silence to give Moon exclusive May 24, 2012
Star Trek's Scotty to be blasted into orbit May 22, 2012
The case of the disappearing pulsar May 22, 2012
Probe Mars for signs of ET say astrophysicists May 21, 2012
SpaceX Dragon ship aborts launch May 20, 2012
Herschel sees intergalactic bridge aglow with stars May 19, 2012
NASA survey counts potentially hazardous asteroids May 18, 2012
Sun-like stars and superflares May 17, 2012
Teleportation record heralds secure global network May 16, 2012
Dust rings not 'smoking gun' for planets after all May 15, 2012
Earth-facing sunspots could erupt this weekend May 13, 2012
Asteroid Vesta is 'last of a kind' rock May 11, 2012
James Webb telescope's 'first light' instrument ready to ship May 10, 2012
Spitzer sees the light of alien super-Earth May 9, 2012
Hot Jupiters oust their siblings May 8, 2012
LHC prepares for data pile-up May 7, 2012
Space weather expert has ominous forecast May 6, 2012
Black hole caught red-handed in a stellar homicide May 4, 2012
ESA approves Jupiter's moons mission May 3, 2012
California meteorite is rare rock laden with organics May 2, 2012
Ancient asteroids kept on coming May 1, 2012


Dragon at the ISS
Splashdown for SpaceX Dragon spacecraft
(May 31, 2012)


The American SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule has splashed down in the ocean off the California coast. The return to Earth completes a historic first mission to the International Space Station (ISS) by a privately operated vehicle. Impact with the water was confirmed at 08:42 Pacific Daylight Time (15:42 GMT; 16:42 BST).

Read more. BBC

Gamma-ray jets
Ghostly jets seen streaming from Milky Way's core
(May 30, 2012)


Astronomers have found the best evidence yet that a pair of jets recently emanated from the dormant gravitational monster that lies at the center of the Milky Way, a supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A*. The discovery of the faint gamma-ray jets by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope suggests that Sag A* could have been active as recently as 50,000 years ago, after it gulped down a gas cloud with a mass about 100 times that of the Sun.

Read more. Nature

Artwork of NuSTAR in orbit
NASA to hold news conference about NuSTAR launch
(May 28, 2012)


NASA will hold a news conference on Wednesday, May 30 at 10 a.m. PDT to discuss the upcoming launch of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a mission to hunt for black holes. NuSTAR will observe some of the hottest, densest and most energetic objects in the universe, including black holes, their high-speed particle jets, ultra-dense neutron stars, supernova remnants, and our sun.

Read more. NASA/JPL

SKA, artwork
Africa and Australasia to share Square Kilometre Array
(May 27, 2012)


South Africa, Australia and New Zealand will host the biggest radio telescope ever built. The nations belonging to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) organization took the decision at a meeting on Friday. The 1.5bn-euro (1.2bn) SKA's huge fields of antennas will sweep the sky for answers to the major outstanding questions in astronomy.

Read more. BBC

Artwork of Dragon at ISS
SpaceX Dragon set for rendezvous with station
(May 25, 2012)


The SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule is expected to join up with the International Space Station (ISS) on Friday. NASA has cleared the unmanned vehicle to move in close to the orbiting platform after a successful series of demonstrations on Thursday. SpaceX is attempting to become the first commercial concern to run a freight service to the ISS.

Read more. BBC

tube-like structures in ALH84001
Bottled carbon from Mars bodes well for ancient aliens
(May 24, 2012)


Tiny carbon nuggets in meteorites from Mars were formed by cooling magma, not left by ancient alien microbes. That's both good news and bad news for astrobiologists. The 1996 discovery of carbonate structures in meteorite ALH-84001 – which travelled to Earth from Mars more than 13,000 years ago was hailed at the time as evidence that alien microbes once lived on the red planet.

Read more. New Scientist

Neil Armstrong
Neil Armstrong breaks his silence to give Moon exclusive
(May 24, 2012)


The first person to walk on the Moon has a reputation for hardly ever giving interviews. It was therefore something of a coup for Alex Malley, chief executive of Certified Practicing Accountants of Australia, to secure almost an hour of the astronaut's time to discuss his historic trip. In it, Armstrong reveals he concern about NASA's current direction and his belief, before the flight, that Apollo 11 had only a 50:50 chance of reaching the Moon's surface safely.

Read more. The Guardian

space memorial cannisters
Star Trek's Scotty to be blasted into orbit
(May 22, 2012)


Star Trek fans remember him as the USS Enterprise's chief engineer, a no-nonsense Scot whose role at the controls of the ship's transporter system spawned one of sci-fi's most legendary catchphrases. On Tuesday however, it was the turn of actor James Doohan himself to be "beamed up" to where few have ventured before when his remains, and that of more than 300 hardcore space enthusiasts, were blasted into orbit aboard the same Falcon 9 that launched the Dragon capsule.

Read more. The Guardian

J0737-3039B
The case of the disappearing pulsar
(May 22, 2012)


The crime scene: 1600 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. The victim: radio pulsar J0737-3039B. For five years, Pulsar B had blinked faithfully at a team of astronomers watching from radio telescopes on Earth. The star was a spectacular find: unlike every other pulsar ever observed, this one was in a close binary orbit with another pulsar. Together, the pair provided a precise laboratory to test Einstein's theory of general relativity, and a means of detailing how pulsars behave. But in March 2008, Pulsar B went dark.

Read more. New Scientist

Mars
Probe Mars for signs of ET say astrophysicists
(May 21, 2012)


Physicists Paul Davies and Robert Wagner of Arizona State University argued last year that it makes sense to widen the search for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence by scouring the Moon for possible alien artifacts. At Penn State, researchers have now propose the same type of search for Mars. "Searches to date of the solar system are sufficiently incomplete that we cannot rule out the possibility that nonterrestrial artifacts are present and may even be observing us," said Jacob Haqq-Misra and Ravi Kopparapu.

Read more. Daily Galaxy

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