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Archeo-news archive: March-April 2007





commentary on Aristotle
Text reveals more ancient secrets
(Apr 29, 2007)


Experts are "lost for words" to have found that a medieval prayer book has yielded yet another key ancient text buried within its parchment. Works by mathematician Archimedes and the politician Hyperides had already been found buried within the book, known as the Archimedes Palimpsest. But now advanced imaging technology has revealed a third text – a commentary on the philosopher Aristotle.

Read more. Source: BBC

Great Pyramid construction using internal ramps
Mystery of Great Pyramid 'solved'
(Mar 31, 2007)


A French architect claims to have solved the mystery of how Egypt's Great Pyramid was built. Jean-Pierre Houdin said the 4,500-year-old pyramid, just outside Cairo, was built using an inner ramp to lift the massive stones into place. Other theories contend that the three million stones – each 2.5 tons – were pushed into place using external ramps.

Read more. Source: BBC


terracotta warriors
Pollen clue to clay army origins
(Mar 27, 2007)


Ancient pollen could lead scientists to the kilns where the figures in China's terracotta army were made. The 2,200 year-old clay army of 8,000 soldiers, 300 horses and 200 chariots guards the tomb of Qin Shihuang, the first emperor of China. Soils from different regions contain distinct pollen "signatures", reflecting variations in vegetation.

Read more. Source: BBC

Silbury Hill
Roman clues found at ancient hill
(Mar 10, 2007)


Archaeologists have found traces of a Roman settlement at a 5,000-year-old landmark man-made hill in Wiltshire. English Heritage believes there was a Roman community at Silbury Hill about 2,000 years ago. The 130ft Neolithic mound near Avebury – one of Europe's largest prehistoric monuments – is thought to have been created some 3,000 years earlier.

Read more. Source: BBC

The Thirteen Towers
Towers point to ancient Sun cult
(Mar 2, 2007)


The oldest solar observatory in the Americas has been found, suggesting the existence of early, sophisticated Sun cults, scientists report. It comprises of a group of 2,300-year-old structures, known as the Thirteen Towers, which are found in the Chankillo archaeological site, Peru. The towers span the annual rising and setting arcs of the Sun, providing a solar calendar to mark special dates.

Read more. Source: BBC

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