Earth from space banner
home > current paleo-news > paleo-news archive: Apr-Jun 2008





Paleo-news archive: April-June 2008





human brain
Brain size 'not key to intellect'
(Jun 10, 2008)


Size may not be everything when it comes to brain evolution, say experts. Instead, UK research reveals that the rising complexity of connections between brain cells may have been the biggest driving force. The Nature Neuroscience study found clear differences between brain junctions in mammals, insects and single cell creatures.

Read more. Source: BBC

oldest live birth
Fossil reveals oldest live birth
(May 31, 2008)


A fossil fish uncovered in Australia is the oldest-known example of a mother giving birth to live young, scientists have reported in the journal Nature. The 380 million-year-old specimen has been preserved with an embryo still attached by its umbilical cord. The find pushes back the emergence of this reproductive strategy by some 200 million years.

Read more. Source: BBC

artist's impression of azhdarchids stalking prey
Fossil prints reveal giant winged reptile was a stalker
(May 28, 2008)


The largest creatures that ever flew may have spent much of their time on the ground, research suggests. Azhdarchids were a type of pterosaur living at the time of the dinosaurs. Their wingspans could exceed 10 metres (32ft). They were thought to have lived like seagulls or pelicans, patrolling coastlines from the air and swooping down on fish in the water. But new evidence from their fossil distribution and footprints suggests they were more likely to stalk prey on foot.

Read more. Source: Guardian

Dinosaur footprints in Yemen
New dinosaur tracks discovered
(May 23, 2008)


Dinosaur footprints made 150 million years ago in the bedrock of what is now Yemen are the first to be discovered in the Arabian Peninsula, say scientists. The two separate trackways were made by a herd of 11 sauropods, and a lone two-legged plant-eating dinosaur belonging to the ornithopod family. They went unnoticed for so long because they were covered by rubble and debris.

Read more. Source: BBC

Tasmanian tiger
Tasmanian tiger DNA 'resurrected'
(May 20, 2008)


A fragment of DNA from the Tasmanian tiger has been brought back to life. Australian scientists extracted genetic material from a 100-year-old museum specimen, and put it into a mouse embryo to study how it worked. It is the first time DNA of an extinct species has been used in this way, says a University of Melbourne team.

Read more. Source: BBC

bushmen
Human line 'nearly split in two'
(Apr 27, 2008)


Ancient humans started down the path of evolving into two separate species before merging back into a single population, a genetic study suggests. The genetic split in Africa resulted in distinct populations that lived in isolation for as much as 100,000 years, the scientists say. This could have been caused by arid conditions driving a wedge between humans in eastern and southern Africa.

Read more. Source: BBC

organisms found in ancient amber
Secret 'dino bugs' revealed
(Apr 2, 2008)


Paleontologist Paul Tafforeau and colleague Malvina Lak have put kilos of opaque amber chunks in the way of this beam and have found a treasure trove of ancient organisms. From more than 600 blocks, they have identified nearly 360 fossil animals. Wasps, flies, ants – even spiders. There are also small fragments of plant material. All of it caught up in the sticky goo of some prehistoric tree and then locked away until modern science provided the key.

Read more. Source: BBC

BACK TO TOP



You are here:

Home
   > Paleo-news
   > Paleo-news archive
         Apr-Jun 2008


Other news sections

Latest science news
Archeo news
Eco news
Health news
Living world news
Robot diaries
Strange news
Tech news


Also on this site:

Encyclopedia of Science

Encyclopedia of Alternative Energy and Sustainable Living

News archive
Bookshop
Contact