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permutable prime




Also known as an absolute prime, a prime number with at least two distinct digits which remains prime on every rearrangement (permutation) of the digits. For example, 337 is a permutable prime because each of 337, 373, and 733 are prime. Most likely, in base ten, the only permutable primes are 13, 17, 37, 79, 113, 199, 337, and their permutations. Obviously permutable primes cannot have any of the digits 2, 4, 6, 8 or 5. They also cannot have all four of the digits 1, 3, 7, and 9 simultaneously.


Related categories

   • PRIME NUMBERS
   • TYPES OF NUMBER