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duct design and installation





Ducts located within the conditioned space avoid the energy losses associated with most duct systems
Ducts located within the conditioned space avoid the energy losses associated with most duct systems
'Trunk and branch' and 'radial' configurations of supply ducts are most suitable for incorporating within the conditioned space of a home
"Trunk and branch" and "radial" configurations of supply ducts are most suitable for incorporating within the conditioned space of a home
Efficient and well-designed duct systems distribute air properly throughout your home without leaking to keep all rooms at a comfortable temperature. The system should provide balanced supply and return flow to maintain a neutral pressure within the house.

Since even well-sealed and insulated ducts will leak and lose some heat, many new energy-efficient homes place the duct system within the conditioned space of the home. The simplest way to accomplish this is to hide the ducts in dropped ceilings and in corners of rooms. Ducts can also be located in a sealed and insulated chase extending into the attic or built into raised floors. In both of these latter cases, care must be taken during construction to prevent contractors from using the duct chases for wiring or other utilities.

Ducts located within the conditioned space avoid the energy losses associated with most duct systems. In either case, actual ducts must be used: chases and floor cavities should not be used as ducts. Regardless of where they are installed, ducts should be well sealed. Although ducts can be configured in a number of ways, the "trunk and branch" and "radial" supply duct configurations are most suitable for ducts located in conditioned spaces.

"Trunk and branch" and "radial" configurations of supply ducts are most suitable for incorporating within the conditioned space of a home. Air return duct systems can be configured in two ways: each room can have a return duct that sends air back to the heating and cooling equipment, or return grills can be located in central locations on each floor. For the latter case, either grills must be installed to allow air to pass out of closed rooms, or short "jumper ducts" can be installed to connect the vent in one room with the next, allowing air to flow back to the central return grilles. Door undercuts help but are usually not sufficient for return air flow.


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   • COOLING, REFRIGERATION, AND AIR CONDITIONING
   • HEATING