A

David

Darling

Welcome to my website

I'm an astronomer, science writer, and musician based in Dundee, Scotland. On this website, now into its 19th year, you'll find about 15,000 pages of information divided into five major encyclopedia – of science, alternative energy and sustainable living, history, music, and science for children. There are links to all these resources on this page.

 

Also on this page, down the right-hand side, you'll see listed many of my books and my music album, together with links to them at Amazon. Most of the books are available in print or Kindle format; the album can be downloaded or streamed from all major digital platforms, including iTunes and Spotify.

 

Many thanks for stopping by. For daily updates, please follow me on Facebook and Twitter

 

The Children’s Encyclopedia of Science contains a range of resources aimed at younger readers

My latest book Weird Maths, coauthored with Agnijo Banerjee, is now available worldwide in bookshops and online. For more, see www.weirdmaths.com

 

Ian Stewart, author of Significant Figures : “A glorious trip through some of the wilder regions of the mathematical landscape, explaining why they are important and useful, but mostly revelling in the sheer joy of the unexpected. Highly recommended!”

 

Clifford A. Pickover, author of The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension : “Darling and Banerjee take us on a captivating ride through a vast landscape of mathematics, touching on mesmerising topics that include randomness, higher dimensions, alien music, chess, chaos, prime numbers, cicadas, infinity, and more. Read this book and soar.”

 

John Stillwell, Professor of Mathematics, University of San Francisco, and author of Elements of Mathematics : “In this inspired collaboration, a young maths prodigy teams up with a popular science writer to present a fresh view of the world of mathematics. Together they fearlessly tackle some of the most weird and wonderful topics in mathematics today, rightly believing that “if you can’t explain something in plain language then you don’t properly understand it”. Clearly, they understand it.”