Worlds of David Darling
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helix




circular helix and cylindroconical helix
A circular helix (right) and cylindroconical helix (left). In each case the curve (red) makes a constant angle with the elements (e.g., the blue lines) in the surface on which it is draw.
A curve in three dimensions, the tangent to which makes a constant angle with a fixed line. A circular helix is formed by winding a line around a cylinder so the radius is always the same. A conical helix is formed by winding a line around a cone, so that, consequently, its radius constantly changes. Springs often take the form of various kinds of helices. In nature, the DNA molecule is in the shape of a double helix.


Related category

   • SPACE CURVES